Metro Archives (circa 1990 via NRHP)
Share on Facebook
Share on Twitter
Share on Google+
Share on LinkedIn
Pin to Pinterest
Share on StumbleUpon
+

A new green roof is planned for the Louisville Metro Archives building near the corner of Seventh Street and Industry Road in part of the Algonquin neighborhood designated as Park Hill. A four-story brick and concrete warehouse at 635 Industry Road will receive the new roof as part of $7 million in federal stimulus funding heading to Louisville for energy efficiency improvements.

Metro Archives (circa 1990 via NRHP)
Metro Archives circa 1990. (via NRHP)

The structure housing Metro Archives is part of the B.F. Avery & Sons Industrial District and is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. Eight remaining buildings on the 57-acre campus once producing agricultural implements were built between 1909 and 1919 and are connected by underground tunnels, some with trolleys (perhaps along the lines of these other freight subways). Avery & Sons operated from 1845 until 1957. The structure receiving the green roof was built in 1919 and served as a warehouse for the industrial operation.

The green roof is part of a $1.5 million grant from the U.S. Department of Energy intended to improve efficiency of government buildings. Besides the Metro Archives green roof, funds will cover solar panels and new energy efficient lighting at government buildings.

Metro Archives represents the second Metro Louisville building to build a green roof. The Metro Development Center on Fifth Street Downtown opened its green roof this Spring. We covered many of the benefits it will provide in an earlier article. The Louisville Zoo also plans a large green roof on its HerpAquarium building using federal funds. Metro Louisville plans to install additional green roofs in the future where buildings are deemed structurally sufficient to handle the extra weight.

Remaining funds from the overall $7 million stimulus grant will be used for various efforts around Louisville all geared towards increasing efficiency. Here are the planned uses:

  • 5 million to install energy-efficient lights around the arena project and in suburban areas where no electrical infrastructure exists;
  • $1.5 million to add green roofs, solar panels and efficient lighting to city government buildings;
  • $1.4 million for a revolving loan fund to help businesses improve their energy efficiency. Companies and small-businesses can apply for the loans through the city’s Economic Development Department;
  • $1.4 million to create a loan program at the Louisville Community Development Bank so non-profit organizations can make energy-efficient improvements to their buildings; an additional $200,000 will establish a fund for non-profit companies to conduct energy audits.
  • $1 million to synchronize traffic lights on major suburban corridors in Louisville, including Dixie Highway and Shelbyville Road.

Related Links

Share on Facebook
Share on Twitter
Share on Google+
Share on LinkedIn
Pin to Pinterest
Share on StumbleUpon
+
Branden Klayko

Branden Klayko

Founder and Editor at Broken Sidewalk
Branden founded Broken Sidewalk in 2008 while practicing architecture in Louisville. He continued the site for seven years while living in New York City, returning to Louisville in 2016. Branden is a graduate of the College of Architecture at Washington University in St. Louis, and has covered architecture, design, and urbanism for The Architect's Newspaper, Designers & Books, Inhabitat, and the American Institute of Architects.
Branden Klayko

Leave a Reply