Old Louisville Pink Palace
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One of Louisville’s most famous 19th century mansions can’t find a buyer. The Pink Palace on St. James Court in Old Louisville has recently been taken off the market after no offers surfaced in five months. A tipster pointed us to a listing for the house in Preservation magazine which lists the house for sale at $875,000.

The magazine, operated by the National Trust For Historic Places, went on to describe the house:

The elegant century-old craftsmanship is dazzling. The mansion features intricate millwork, dramatic archways, massive wood mantels, and oak hardwood floors. The upper floors boast dramatic views of nearby Central Park, designed by Frederick Law Olmsted.

The owner says the market just isn’t right to sell such a magnificent home. He finds most people in Old Louisville are looking for cheaper homes to fix up, not an already restored mansion in perfect condition. While the house isn’t formally being marketed, the owner will still consider offers on the property.

The Pink Palace even comes with its own web site. The home was originally built as a gentleman’s clubhouse for Louisville’s emerging first suburb where wealthy Louisville men retreated for a cigar and game of cards. The home features a large yard with a swimming pool. Here’s a little more history including how the house was painted pink:

Completed in 1892 as red brick Queen Anne Victorian, the Palace was christened the “St. James Court Casino.” The home was sold to the Women’s Christian Temperance Union in 1910, who immediately painted it pink to distance the organization from the building’s past usage. Since then, it has served as home to a number of Louisville mayors and other noteworthies.

Old Louisville Pink Palace
Old Louisville Pink Palace. (Branden Klayko / Broken Sidewalk)
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Branden Klayko

Branden Klayko

Founder and Editor at Broken Sidewalk
Branden founded Broken Sidewalk in 2008 while practicing architecture in Louisville. He continued the site for seven years while living in New York City, returning to Louisville in 2016. Branden is a graduate of the College of Architecture at Washington University in St. Louis, and has covered architecture, design, and urbanism for The Architect's Newspaper, Designers & Books, Inhabitat, and the American Institute of Architects.
Branden Klayko

3 COMMENTS

  1. I hate the color pink, but aside from that this is my DREAM house and if I lived in the States and had the money I would buy it in an instant!

  2. The inset paragraph about 1910 and the WCTU is just bullshit urban legend. The Temperance Union didn’t buy the property until after WW2. New policy for BrokenSidewalk: use primary sources for historical data.

  3. @Andy: You’ve caught us in an article from the infancy of Broken Sidewalk way back in 2009. As should be vividly apparent, our standards on sources are much higher today. It’s true that plaques and historical markers are often wildly inaccurate, and it’s good to point them out as such as they occur, so thank you for helping set the record straight.

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