Rendering of Bristol's Main & Clay development. (Courtesy Bristol Development)
Rendering of Bristol's Main & Clay development. (Courtesy Bristol Development)
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What's This?

The construction fence is up, asbestos is out, and crews are set to begin work on a 262-unit, $50 million apartment building in Butchertown. According to the Courier-Journal‘s Sheldon Shafer, Nashville-based developer Bristol Development Group has closed on the property assemblage and has obtained building permits, so demolition crews will soon prepare the site for construction of the so-called Main & Clay development.

Located on a parcel just east of Interstate 65 and bound by East Main StreetClay Street, and Washington Street, the seven-story building replaces a cluster of one- and two-story buildings and parking lots on its half-block, 1.5-acre site. Several of the buildings are historic and Bristol is rebuilding four of their facades into the new building, a move that angered some preservationists.

The Main & Clay site. (Courtesy Bing; Montage by Broken Sidewalk)
The Main & Clay site. (Courtesy Bing; Montage by Broken Sidewalk)

Shafer reported that Bristol paid Trompeter Realty Group $4.2 million in July to complete the land transaction. The article added that Metro Louisville will subsidize the project with up to $4.4 million in property tax rebates from a mini-TIF zone.

While some of the old buildings on the site, a local landmark district, are quality examples of Louisville’s disappearing vernacular style from the mid- to late-19th century, their scale has been dwarfed by the enormous Ohio River Bridges Project. Main & Clay’s seven-story stature will help block the freeway and provide needed density for Butchertown and Nulu. One unfortunate detail has been revealed, however: Shafer reported the official name of the building will be “Main & Clay: in Historic Butchertown.” That extra but just doesn’t seem necessary.

Rendering of Bristol's Main & Clay development. (Courtesy Bristol Development)
Rendering of Bristol’s Main & Clay development from Washington Street. (Courtesy Bristol Development)

Main & Clay will include a mix of one-, two-, and three-bedroom apartments with a few townhouses. According to the C-J:

Rents will range from $900 to $3,500, with an average monthly rental of around $1.600, Carlisle said…Unit size is to vary from 550 to 1,800 square feet. The plan includes 2,400 square feet of ground-level retailing and a 380-space parking structure.

Site amenities will include a clubroom, a courtyard, outdoor kitchen, outdoor pool, outdoor patio social area with televisions and hammocks, a fitness center, a pet spa and a dog walk.

Bristol expects the building’s first tenants to arrive in spring 2017.

 

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Branden Klayko

Branden Klayko

Founder and Editor at Broken Sidewalk
Branden founded Broken Sidewalk in 2008 while practicing architecture in Louisville. He continued the site for seven years while living in New York City, returning to Louisville in 2016. Branden is a graduate of the College of Architecture at Washington University in St. Louis, and has covered architecture, design, and urbanism for The Architect's Newspaper, Designers & Books, Inhabitat, and the American Institute of Architects.
Branden Klayko

3 COMMENTS

  1. Man, soon Louisville’s going to look like San Francisco with nothing but generic revitecture. Though more trigger happy about demolishing anything interesting. And again the taxpayers are foregoing over 4 mill for something they didn’t ask for.

  2. thinking that this speaks in any way of Butchertown just shows how these firms get their marketing hats on backwards. Hey Bristol, Butchertown is
    Not a selling point here(sniff test!!!).

  3. 1960’s architecture deserves to be out in the suburbs, this style does not mix well in a urban location. Lou’s leaders need to do better with design guidelines or before you know it, Lou will look like a gigantic suburb in search of a city

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