Rendering of Bristol's Main & Clay development. (Courtesy Bristol Development)
Rendering of Bristol's Main & Clay development. (Courtesy Bristol Development)
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On Thursday, the Louisville Metro Historic Landmarks & Preservation Districts Commission delayed voting on Bristol Development’s proposed Main & Clay development on the border between Downtown Louisville, Butchertown, and Nulu, the Courier-Journal reported.

The $50 million, 260-apartment building went before the commission after OPEN Louisville’s lawyer Steven T. Porter appealed the project‘s approval by the Butchertown Architectural Review Committee. The building has been supported by both the Butchertown Neighborhood Association and the Nulu Business Association but has drawn criticism from some preservationists over its plans to demolish three historic buildings and incorporate their facades into the new structure. For a full description of the project, see previous coverage of the building on Broken Sidewalk.

[UPDATE: Changed the date and venue—again. The original agenda released by Metro Louisville states the wrong date and venue for the meeting.] The commission is scheduled to resume deliberating the project at its next meeting on Thursday, February 19 at 8:30a.m. Meetings are open to the public and take place at the Old Jail Building, 514 West Liberty Street.

Rendering of Bristol's Main & Clay development. (Courtesy Bristol Development)
Rendering of Bristol’s Main & Clay development. (Courtesy Bristol Development)
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Branden Klayko

Branden Klayko

Founder and Editor at Broken Sidewalk
Branden founded Broken Sidewalk in 2008 while practicing architecture in Louisville. He continued the site for seven years while living in New York City, returning to Louisville in 2016. Branden is a graduate of the College of Architecture at Washington University in St. Louis, and has covered architecture, design, and urbanism for The Architect's Newspaper, Designers & Books, Inhabitat, and the American Institute of Architects.
Branden Klayko

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