(Diane Deaton-Street)
(Diane Deaton-Street)
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What's This?

Congratulations to Neal for being first to correctly identify our last Sidewalk Challenge as Sixth Street looking south toward Muhammad Ali Boulevard in Downtown Louisville next to the old Armory.

Here’s a new sidewalk challenge for this week ready to be identified in the comments below for your chance to win an official Broken Sidewalk magnet. (The rules: First correct response wins; Leave a real email so we can get in touch if you win; No repeat winners for four months; Comments must be left on this news roundup.) Good luck!

And now for the week’s top urbanism #cityreads:

Jobs Are Moving Beyond Louisville Residents’ Typical Commutes, Report Says. For Louisville there seems to be a mismatch between repopulating the urban core and the migration of jobs to the outer suburbs. WFPL

Grimm City. Flea Folly Architects are using some famous works of fiction, and their authors, to design the storybook cities those famous writers might have designed for themselves. BLDGBLOG

How New York, Chicago, and L.A. Explain the 1960s and ’70s. “The City Lost and Found: Capturing New York, Chicago, and Los Angeles, 1960-1980, currently at the Princeton University Art Museum, explores the master plans, protests, and art that defined the massive shifts that took place within these three cities’ streets, homes, and offices during those years.” CityLab

Mass Tax Foreclosure Threatens Detroit Homeowners. Detroit simply can’t catch a break, and its austerity-inducing, punitive tax collection measures don’t seem to be helping. NPR

Harnessing the power of geodesign to create better cities and spaces. As geospatial technologies become more user friendly (check out QGIS), the public gains a new design tool to build better cities. Archinect

How to dramatically improve public transit without building more of it. Emily Badger reports on the urban planning and advocacy group SPUR, which is taking a look at easy fixes for major transit inefficiencies in the Bay Area. The Washington Post: Wonkblog

Building Capacity in Underserved Urban Areas. Seeing projects through—whether affordable housing, public space, or infrastructure—for low-income populations in cities like Los Angeles requires grit and coalition-building. Planetizen

Federal Grants Hard to Manage in Distressed Cities?  A recent report shows that distressed cities find it difficult to navigate the intricacies of a federal grant making process. Next City

Who’s in charge of transforming Detroit? The real promise of urban transformation comes not from the outside in, but from the inside out—building a new city from the bottom up. Transformation

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