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It’s already been decided that the Confederate Monument site at Third Street and Brandeis Street is to be paved over to speed through more cars. The divisive monument will be removed, cleaned, and installed at another site in Louisville. And now the city needs your input on where that site might be.

The Metro Louisville Commission on Public Art (COPA) will host a public meeting on the topic this upcoming Monday, July 25 at 10:00a.m. in the Old Jail Auditorium, 514 West Liberty Street. If you’ve got an idea for where the obelisk should be located, drop by and submit public testimony or comment. And tell us in the comments below.

Given the controversy generated by the move, the city appears to be expecting a crowd. If you attend, you’ll have a maximum of three minutes to speak at the meeting. So get your notes in order.

If you can’t attend, you can still submit a comment before the meeting to publicartinfo@louisvilleky.gov or send it in the mail to 444 South Fifth Street, Suite 600, Louisville, Kentucky 40202. All comments must be made by Friday, July 22 at 4:00p.m. if you want the city to read them.

While the monument’s on the move, the public space it anchored has been slowly eroding over the past 70 years. It’s worth taking a look back at our longform analysis here of why that kind of civic gesture is important, and how Louisville is losing out with more asphalt.

 

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Branden Klayko

Branden Klayko

Founder and Editor at Broken Sidewalk
Branden founded Broken Sidewalk in 2008 while practicing architecture in Louisville. He continued the site for seven years while living in New York City, returning to Louisville in 2016. Branden is a graduate of the College of Architecture at Washington University in St. Louis, and has covered architecture, design, and urbanism for The Architect's Newspaper, Designers & Books, Inhabitat, and the American Institute of Architects.
Branden Klayko

2 COMMENTS

  1. Yep, very convenient to schedule to the meeting during working hours… only community organizers or others who don’t work are able to attend. Why not schedule the meeting when actual taxpayers can attend.

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