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Category Archives: General Louisville

Below are listed the articles filed under General Louisville

Preservation in Louisville After the Yates Amendment

Sunday, August 12, 2012 by Branden Klayko.
Three Individual Landmarks: Metro Hall, City Hall, and Fire Station #2. (BS Postcard Archive)

Three Individual Landmarks: Metro Hall, City Hall, and Fire Station #2. (BS Postcard Archive)

In 1973, Mayor Harvey Sloan oversaw the creation of Louisville’s first Landmarks Commission, modeled after an ordinance in New York City, making preservation public policy for the first time in the city. Now 39 years later, Louisville has created on average two Individual Landmarks a year, seven Landmarks Districts, a new merged government structure with new political dynamics, and the Metro Council has voted to change how preservation happens in the city.

In early February, Metro Councilmember David Yates sponsored an amendment to Louisville’s Landmarks Ordinance, complaining the original system lacked oversight, accountability, and public participation. Quickly joining Yates, eight additional council members, mostly representing suburban districts around the old Urban Service District, signed on as cosponsors. The amendment was introduced in Metro Council on Thursday, February 9, 2012, and over the proceeding six months, politicians and preservationists clashed on how Landmarks designation procedures should work, resulting in a newly politicized process and additional thresholds to be met in the public petition process. But in all the arguing, Louisville missed a real opportunity for preservation reform.

Continue reading after the jump.

Louisville still thumbs nose at pedestrians at construction sites

Friday, August 12, 2011 by Erik Weber.
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Sidewalk closed at West Broadway between 7th and 8th streets. (Erik Weber)

Sidewalk closed at West Broadway between 7th and 8th streets. (Erik Weber)

There was a time when Louisville summarily ignored the needs of pedestrians when it came to construction projects around the city.  Unfortunately, it appears we’re still stuck in that time today.

Construction sites continue to pop up around the city that make absolutely no attempt to provide pedestrian accommodations beyond the the singularly unhelpful and downright insulting “Sidewalk Closed” signs.

Continue reading after the jump.

When bike infrastructure is designed by drivers

Tuesday, August 9, 2011 by Erik Weber.
A dangerously narrow bike lane on Westport Road. (Erik Weber)

A dangerously narrow bike lane on Westport Road. (Erik Weber)

Would you build a garage on your house without taking measurements beforehand to make sure your two cars fit? No? Well it seems many planners and designers have taken this approach to building bicycle infrastructure.

Bike lanes like this are beyond useless, they are actually dangerous.  These get built because road engineers read standards calling for minimum width of bike lanes to be 3 feet. So they measure 3 feet from the curb’s edge and call it a day.  The greatest irony is that by today’s increased traffic and faster road standards, engineers would never design a street so narrow that cars would be forced to drive in the curb gutter, yet this is perfectly acceptable for bikes.

Continue reading after the jump.

In Memoriam: Ann Sinclair Hodges Hassett, 1941-2011

Sunday, August 7, 2011 by Joanne Weeter.
Ann Sinclair Hodges Hassett. (Donald Vish / Flickr)

Ann Sinclair Hodges Hassett. (Donald Vish / Flickr)

The preservation movement is not the acting out of a desire to live in the past; rather, it is an attempt to fashion our world, at least in part, from the world that was fashioned for us.  A society needs that continuous harmony in order to see itself as an extension of—and the improvements upon—that which came before. —Ann Hassett

“Preservation,” added Ann Hassett, “is thoughtful evolution.”

The City of Louisville, the Commonwealth of Kentucky, and indeed the nation, lost a great preservationist on August 1, 2011 with the death of Ann S. Hassett. Ann was an historic preservation leader, champion, administrator, and organizer of the highest order and her presence will be sorely missed.

Continue reading after the jump.

Why don’t businesses take a hint on bike parking?

Monday, August 1, 2011 by Erik Weber.
No bike parking at the Dutchmans Lane Shopping Center. (Erik Weber)

No bike parking at the Dutchmans Lane Shopping Center. (Erik Weber)

In many cities, particularly examples like Louisville that aren’t quite as far along on bike infrastructure as the usual velo-havens (Portland, Minneapolis, et al), you don’t have to look far to find bikes locked up outside businesses, but lacking a real bike rack. These bikes are usually latched to anything in sight: parking meters, trees, hand rails, exposed pipes.

Some places will take the initiative and install a bike rack, or petition the city to have them installed. Most just sit around and do nothing. Apparently, the YMCA of Greater Louisville is one of the latter.

Continue reading after the jump.

Water main issues are a preview of the future

Friday, July 29, 2011 by Erik Weber.
Water main break floods Floyd Street on UL's Belknap Campus. (Courtesy University of Louisville)

Water main break floods Floyd Street on UL's Belknap Campus. (Courtesy University of Louisville)

In the past few years, Louisville has been plagued by several large water main breaks around the city.  Often a result of aging infrastructure in older, more central parts of the city, these incidents are merely a warning of the major issues we will face in coming decades as our sprawling suburbs age.

A massive break near U of L’s campus several weeks ago left a large portion of the population without potable water for several days. Yesterday, a smaller main ruptured in Audobon Park.  Some of the water infrastructure in South Louisville where the main broke is nearly a century old.  In the next several years much of this infrastructure in Louisville’s central neighborhoods will need to be replaced or risk more ruptures, leaks, and water outages.

Continue reading after the jump.

Caption Contest: Colonel Sanders and Alice Cooper

Wednesday, June 22, 2011 by Branden Klayko.
Colonel Sanders & Alice Cooper (Via Retronaut)

Colonel Sanders & Alice Cooper (Via Retronaut)

It’s Colonel Sanders hanging out with Alice Cooper. I suppose this means it’s time for a caption contest. Do your worst in the comments below. (Check out How to be a Retronaut for more famous people hanging out.)

Gravity Was Everywhere Back Then

Tuesday, June 21, 2011 by Branden Klayko.
View of the set from Gravity was Everywhere Back Then (Courtesy GWEBT)

View of the set from Gravity was Everywhere Back Then (Courtesy GWEBT)

I have wanted to see Pennsylvania-based artist Brent Green’s film Gravity Was Everywhere Back Then since a friend of mine saw it during a Brooklyn rooftop film festival last summer. The film is based on the life of Leonard Wood, a Louisville hardware store clerk who began building onto his house to transform it into a “healing machine” for his sick wife.

Green learned about Wood’s amazing story when his house was condemned, but the multi-media artist rebuilt a new version of the house in his Pennsylvania backyard. Now, thanks to Art Without Walls and the Land of Tomorrow (LOT) gallery, the rebuilt house is on display through the end of the month at LOT Louisville (233 West Broadway).

Check out a video about the installation after the click. I recommend checking it out while you can.

Watch the video after the jump.

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