BS Proposals

Example of a bike lane on the Second Street Bridge (BS Diagram)
Example of a bike lane on the Second Street Bridge (BS Diagram)
Example of a bike lane on the Second Street Bridge (BS Diagram)
Example of a bike lane on the Second Street Bridge. (Broken Sidewalk)

Last summer, Vancouver installed a test protected bike lane on one of their bridges, and now they have seen a 30 percent increase in cycling. Despite some sharrows painted on Louisville’s Second Street Bridge, cycling across the span can feel pretty dangerous and this perception has been a deterrent to many cyclists.

Imaginary infill in the Highlands (Photo by Diane Deaton-Street, Rendering by Broken Sidewalk)
Imaginary infill in the Highlands (Photo by Diane Deaton-Street, Rendering by Broken Sidewalk)
Imaginary infill in the Highlands (Photo by Diane Deaton-Street, Rendering by Broken Sidewalk)
Imaginary infill. (Photo by Diane Deaton-Street, Rendering by Broken Sidewalk)

Louisville needs to start taking infill development seriously. Infill development involves building on underutilized lots inside the city instead of on green fields (i.e. farms) on the suburban fringe. There are vast swaths of land in Louisville, either abandoned brownfield sites, surface level parking lots, or undesirable suburban style buildings in the core that offer opportunities to increase the population density of the existing city and bring about a more walkable Louisville. Spoiler: This is a fake project.

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Louisville Clock (photo by Michael Baker)
Louisville Clock (photo by Michael Baker)
Louisville Clock. (Michael Baker)

Resembling a giant wind-up toy set for an energetic race at high noon, the Louisville Clock or Derby Clock designed by local sculptor Barney Bright has now been painstakingly restored thanks in large part to local businessman Adam Burckle, owner of Adam Matthews, Inc. cheesecake company. Now that restoration work is winding down and the clock ready to be wound up, a site for the clock may have tentatively been found.

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Old Baptist Tabernacle Building in New Albany
Old Baptist Tabernacle Building in New Albany
Old Baptist Tabernacle Building in New Albany. (Branden Klayko / Broken Sidewalk)

A preservation group in New Albany recently announced their intentions to keep one of America’s best collections of historic fire fighting equipment in New Albany. The Friends of the New Albany Fire Museum have launched a $2 million fundraising campaign to purchase the fire fighting collection and display it in downtown New Albany.

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    An honorary block in Manhattan
    An honorary block in Manhattan
    An honorary block in Manhattan. (Branden Klayko / Broken Sidewalk)

    It seems no topic is small enough to cause a fuss, including the simple idea of commemorating a local leader. The latest issue at hand is the renaming of 34th Street to honor the late Rev. Louis Coleman. With the fight over renaming 22nd Street for Dr. Martin Luther King still fresh in the Louisville psyche, we need a better way to commemorate people and ideas without such unneeded controversy. We’re talking more about honorary street name changes in general than the specific case at hand, but it’s a timely fit.

    Urban canyons on Louisville alleyways
    Urban canyons on Louisville alleyways
    Urban canyons on Louisville alleyways. (Branden Klayko / Broken Sidewalk)

    A well-defined city street, whether a wide avenue or narrow alley, with a proper urban edge and buildings lined up in a row can create some of the most pleasant experiences in the urban environment. One of our favorite urban phenomena is the “urban canyon” effect created when the ratio of building height to street width is very high. This pattern was common in many cities, and still is in some cases. The shady, and what some have called congested streetscape, however, was the target of much anti-urban renewal programs of the mid 20th century.

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    Fourth Street Redux
    Fourth Street Redux
    Fourth Street Redux. (Branden Klayko / Broken Sidewalk)

    Somehow this just seems to fit. London has Piccadilly Circus, New York has Times Square, now Louisville has Fourth & Liberty. (This isn’t actually going to happen, but what if…)