(Courtesy MHC)
(Courtesy MHC)
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To honor Black History Month, the Metropolitan Housing Coalition (MHC) is hosting, in partnership with the Anne Braden Institute for Social Justice Research, a public forum on Louisville Metro Government’s action plan to end housing segregation: “Making Louisville Home for Us All.”

The plan was released in February of last year by the The Louisville Metro Human Relations Commission (LMHRC), and offered a broad analysis around the formation of Louisville’s historically troubling housing policies and utilized a diverse series of data to show the continued effects the ongoing problem of housing discrimination. Its central claim: that half of Louisville still resided in “highly segregated” communities.

Although that number was challenged analysis from The City Researcher, their final analysis was that the problem, if not the percentage, was completely accurate.

The report also utilized the action steps developed from the 2010 report Analysis of Impediments to Fair Housing Choice in Louisville Metro, and recommended some concrete steps that Louisville Metro government could make towards mitigating these issues.

This event will include both a presentation on the history of segregation in Louisville by the University of Louisville’s Anne Braden Institute for Social Justice Research, as well as a panel discussion about the plan and implementation with Carolyn Miller-Cooper of Louisville Metro Human Relations Commission, Juan Peña of the KY Commission on Human Rights, Lee Ann Thomas of the Center for Accessible Living.

The event takes place Tuesday, February 10th at 2:00p.m. at New Directions Housing Corporation, 1000 East Liberty Street. The event is free and open to the public.

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1 COMMENT

  1. The chronic race segregated housing in Louisville is a product of exclusionary policies practiced by the white leadership for decades–even centuries. That history is summarized in the Analysis but the document fails to adequately present the racist social dynamic. It focuses on black struggle where it should focus on white exclusion policy. Racism in Louisville is alive and well today and becoming even more entrenched as Move Louisville extends development into the outer suburban ring. We are making the same racist white flight pattern as Detroit where white economic elites ring around a smoking crater of black poverty. Why oh why does this happen ! Because we design it to happen. Instead of announcing a major economic redevelopment program based on our studies of West Louisville race disparate poverty–we announce an ad hoc program of Wal-Marting that is a crude tool for slow community decay. The best assets of talent and culture are ignored that could make West Louisville thrive. At the same time we drain the urban core of density and spend all our money on concrete overpasses. Until the structural racism is recognized as inherent in current infrastructure priorities we won’t have a successful plan for West Louisville. This article is on a critical topic in our community but the preminent non-profits and metro agencies have been too timid to bite the hand that feeds them.

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