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Last weekend, the Germantown Mill Lofts, actually located on the Schnitzelburg side of Goss Avenue, welcomed visitors to check out construction progress and gawk at a furnished model unit.

Jennifer Chappell, a neighborhood resident, was among those to take a look around, and luckily for us, she brought her camera.

(Tim Furlong Jr. / Courtesy Underhill Associates)
The Warehouse Building was the first phase to open. (Tim Furlong Jr. / Courtesy Underhill Associates)

The first section of the apartment complex, the so-called Warehouse Building tucked around the back of the main Goss-facing structure, opened with a mix of 16 studios (about $650 per month) and double-height, loft-style, one-bedroom units (around $1,050 per month). Chappell reported on the Schnitzelburg Area Community Council blog that this building is almost fully occupied.

(Jennifer Chappell)
(Jennifer Chappell)

Underhill Associates were true to their word: the historical and architectural charm has been preserved while providing modern amenities,” Chappell wrote. “If this preview is anything like what we should expect from the main building, we’re in for a real treat.”

Apartments include enormous timber beams, exposed brick, industrial-style ductwork, and barn-style rolling doors. Ground floor units feature concrete floors and the studios above show off the structure’s original wood. “Despite their age, the wood is gorgeous and full of character,” Chappell added.

There are still plenty of units for the leasing at Germantown Mill Lofts, and phases of the project will open through the next year as construction is completed.

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Branden Klayko

Branden Klayko

Founder and Editor at Broken Sidewalk
Branden founded Broken Sidewalk in 2008 while practicing architecture in Louisville. He continued the site for seven years while living in New York City, returning to Louisville in 2016. Branden is a graduate of the College of Architecture at Washington University in St. Louis, and has covered architecture, design, and urbanism for The Architect's Newspaper, Designers & Books, Inhabitat, and the American Institute of Architects.
Branden Klayko

7 COMMENTS

  1. Unfortunately, in Louisville, aka “Possibility City”, the bar is set very low and all developers get all the waivers they request in order to build whatever they want. Don’t expect too much.

  2. Offering $650 studios isn’t as ideally affordable but it’s certainly better than what’s being constructed elsewhere… The prices at Main and Clay and other new buildings and renovations around town are absurd.

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