(Courtesy UL Photo Archives)
(Courtesy UL Photo Archives)
6
shares
Share on Facebook
Share on Twitter
Share on Google+
Share on LinkedIn
Pin to Pinterest
Share on StumbleUpon
+
What's This?

Congrats to Jesuisurbaniste for correctly identifying our last sidewalk photo as Coral Avenue in the Clifton neighborhood.

Here’s a new sidewalk challenge for this week ready to be identified in the comments below for your chance to win an official Broken Sidewalk magnet. (The rules: First correct response wins; Leave a real email so we can get in touch if you win; No repeat winners for four months; Comments must be left on this news roundup.) Good luck!

And now on with the week’s top urbanism #cityreads:

The Urban Death Project: Designing A Better Way To Die. One of the questions quickly raised with an ever increasing concentration of populations into cities is this: What will we do with all the dead bodies? Katrina Spade explores a more sustainable way for us all to rest in urban piece. Fast Company

The High Cost of Poor Land Use. This recent article by Brandon Donnelly looks at The Economist’s recent claim that a combination of “Top Down” planning decisions alongside higher taxes on land value would allow us to better meet our real estate needs. Sustainable Cities Collective

Process and Collaboration: Why Community Design Needs More Cross-Fertilization. An enlightening article by Jess Zimbabwe about going beyond the boundaries of disciplines for a more dynamic, generative community engagement. An especially poignant piece for urbanists in Louisville who are constantly facing the complicated social impacts of history, segregation, and systemic oppression. Impact Design Hub

The Right to Budget. Participatory budgeting work in major cities is beginning to generate real Democratic opportunities for local residents. While the issue of major infrastructural projects looms, this tactical approach to city budgeting can answer some smaller urban needs for local communities. Urban Omnibus

Johannesburg: Why Gated Communities Threaten Democratic Cities. Christina Culwick at Urban Africa takes on the problems of gated communities in Democratic cities. The U.S. could stand to take a look at its own problems with these ‘free riding’ communities as well. Sustainable Cities Collective

Infrastructure as Processional Space. The New York Infrastructural Observatory is taking infrastructure out of the “back yard” and getting folks up close and personal to these necessary components/investments in our urban landscape. BLDGBLOG

A symbol…of the hubris of rampant urbanization. Jody Rosen documented “The Colossal Strangeness of China’s Most Excellent Tourist City.” Archinect

Manila’s Questionable Approach to Greening Informal Settlements. “The idea of making the term informal settlements and ‘danger areas’ synonymous is a very one dimensional and precarious statement. Manila’s complicated history with this issue is now taking the form of reclamation and resettlement plans, which leads to both greening and displacement.” Impact Design Hub

Where the White People Live. “How self-segregation and concentrated affluence became normal in America.” City Lab

Op-Ed: Where GOP Is Strong, Cities Receive Less. “When it comes to federal appropriations, urban areas in states dominated by rural Republicans are at a distinct disadvantage. In search of lobbying power, metros in affected states are banding together.” Planetizen

[Top image: Courtesy UL Photo Archives – Reference.]
Share on Facebook
Share on Twitter
Share on Google+
Share on LinkedIn
Pin to Pinterest
Share on StumbleUpon
+

2 COMMENTS

Leave a Reply