Photo by Diane Deaton-Street
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Photo by Diane Deaton-Street
(Diane Deaton-Street)

Special thanks to our first regular Broken Sidewalk contributor, Diane Deaton-Street, who will be sending in sidewalk views from around the city in upcoming weeks.

Well, we finished skimming over a couple thousand headlines and now feel sufficiently caught up with the goings on in the River City and the related blogosphere. Here’s today’s news along with a few notable headlines from the past few weeks. It’s a lot and you probably have read many of them, but this will hopefully bring us up-to-date.

Local News

Other news of interest

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5 COMMENTS

  1. First, I have to say how delighted I am to see BS back and running, and that the move to NY seems not to have killed this excellent site.

    You know, looking over this backlog of posts, especially the one on the 4SL v CB story, it strikes me that the smart folks in Louisville (and I know that’s the people who come to BS) need to organize some kind of Summit, a live discussion, debate, forum in which powers-that-be and powers-that-want-to-be argue and brainstorm over the direction and shape this city should take. Do we become a truly unique, local-centric, innovative, funky, off-beat town with a sense of place or just another mid-sized city with nice, corporate amenities?

    I moved back to Louisville 3 1/2 years ago (after 35 years in Rochester NY)and have been delighted with the vibe here. At first I thought Abramson was a big part of that vibe, but recently have realized that he is in large part, and despite good intentions, a shill for corporate vision. We need the Cornish v Local issue discussed in a public forum; we need the 8664 proposal adequately debated… We need the Arts, Transportation, Placemaking, Architecture, Food, Creatives, Energy, Technology and Blogging all really passionately, publicly debated in a large enough venue that it gets noticed and the conversation becomes part of everyday life – to everyone in town.

    I will return to reading this site every day. I read CoolTownStudios (http://www.cooltownstudios.com/) every day and get excited about Louisville’s turning that corner, which seems to be just up ahead, towards the kind of placemaking, crowdsourcing, creative energy discussed there. I think a highly visible Louisville Sense of Place Summit would help get us there. Anyone?

  2. Thanks for staying with us through the transition Ken and for your kind words about Broken Sidewalk and its readers. I agree that keeping the topics you mentioned in the dialogue is really valuable in helping us determine where we want Louisville to be and how to get there.

    The Sustainable City Series is one really important aspect of that conversation. Another is discussing topics on Broken Sidewalk with a group that adamantly cares about the future of Louisville. A third important dialogue level happens at the office water cooler, at the coffee shop, or at the kitchen table. They all contribute in their own ways.

    That said, and what I think you are looking for, I think there is still a sort of void in the discussion. The issues you mention include some of the most important and challenging ones that have faced Louisville in years. It’s frustrating that there’s no real outlet where these discussions can have real meaningful impact.

    What form would you like to see them take? How have discussions such as the Sustainable City Series and others helped advance these goals? What scale is best to get the discussion out there? Certainly many of the issues like transportation or the growth of Downtown have ties to the entire community, but can neighborhoods take on a major role in this? What are your thoughts?

  3. One of my favorite references is a collection of essays put together by the Dallas Institute called Stirrings of Culture (http://www.amazon.com/Stirrings-Culture-Robert-J-Sardello/dp/0911005072).It was an outgrowth of the formation of the institute and a formative document for what became the What Makes a City? Conference (http://dallasinstitute.org/programs_centerforthecity.html). It is this kind of thought and talk I see missing here: the bigger, deeper issues of aesthetics, philosophy, phenomenology of the city. UL fails to provide that kind of intellectual leadership. We have support for the arts, we have discussion of economics and logistics, but we seldom discuss Why? And we seldom have the kind of cross-disciplinary discussion that breaks open the Why question: do our strong indie musicians (I’m a big fan) discuss the architecture and environments they perform in? Do they discuss the education, the teachers that got them to music? Do food critics and chefs discuss issues of race and economics in a public way? Do local writers talk with local artists… about the city?

    This is the way my thoughts are going…

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