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So far, we haven’t covered any political stories regarding the upcoming mayoral primary and election. The race is going to be an extremely important one for the future of the city and affects just about everything we cover here at Broken Sidewalk. Because there are so many important issues at stake, I expect political coverage to begin shortly on issues we generally discuss. I already have some ideas and plans for how this coverage will take shape, but I wanted to ask the opinion of Broken Sidewalk readers to learn what you want to see. What are you looking for in political coverage of the mayor’s race on Broken Sidewalk? Discuss in the comments and thanks in advance for your opinions.

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13 COMMENTS

  1. Mayoral discussion issues.

    – Future of Center City, Museum Plaza, RiverPark Place and Iron Quarter

    – Improvement and Moral issues of Police / Fire Departments

    – Louisville taking progressive attitude and not just status quo.

  2. Issue Number 1 Ohio River Bridges plan.
    The next mayor should enthusiasticly support the community consensus of building the east end bridge first. This eliminates Greg fisher from the discusion. I have spoken to other people like myself who will not live in this city if the downtown portion of the Ohio River Bridges Plan is built.

  3. – RAIL (Lightrail, Commuter Rail, streetcars). Let’s have a serious discussion about these possibilities. When cities like Little Rock Arkansas has implemented a streetcar system and we seem to collectively think this is a ludicrous idea I wonder how bright our future really is.

    – Land Use Regs that include green infrastructure requirements like in Portland with the use of bioswales and other devices to control runoff from parking etc.

    – Incentives or other tool to encourage green initiatives.

    I want to hear a mayor speak about the possibilities even if they are a little fantastic, as long as they have some grounding in reality and can expand our thinking beyond what we already know.

  4. Ohio River Bridges is huge. That is issue one for myself and I think most others. I’d generally love to know what areas the candidates live in and what sort of attitude they have about development in the city. Do they value Downtown’s role as the center of the city? I’d be interested to know what their stances were on past projects. For instance, what site they had favored for the arena. I would LOVE to hear how they plan to get Louisville involved in the rail talks, both for a local system, as well as the planned high speed system. That’s assuming that they champion rail at all. This is an incredibly tricky election.

  5. I encourage everyone to look at Tandy’s platform he released today. It’s shockingly progressive and probably the most urbanist one we’ll see. Unfortunately he’s so wrong on the bridges project, but he hits on urban farming, updating the building code for new green standards, mass transit, urban blight, all of the issues that strong urbanists fight for. With the exception of the bridges project, he hits every note on development.

  6. since mr cash has announced his retirement, hearing from the mayoral candidates regarding their vision for local planning issues at large would be interesting. none will have the benefit of mr cash’s experience or any sense of continuity.

    the person the new mayor picks for head of planning and design is going to have a huge job and will have to decide whether to roll with what’s already in place, slowly evolve, or make radical change. the impetus for any of these options will come from the mayor.

  7. Agreed with stunoland totally. Tandy is disqualifying himself not only due to his incorrect and expedient stance on the bridges project, but also that he has displayed such green (a different meaning) behavior on other issues, such as Cordish and Swift, I have to say I have no reason to believe he can deliver on any idea he presents. I mean, what has the man DONE for Louisville, ever? (and I say this as an Obama supporter, so there’s nothing race-based about this)

    Otherwise, I’ll just refer everyone to my top three expectations for the next mayor of Louisville on my discussion board: ttp://www.historyandissues.org/louisville/viewtopic.php?t=1660

    In my estimation, the next mayor most focus the most on 1) Economic Diversity and Regionalism; 2) Transportation Sanity; and 3) Transparency / Accountability. See the link for details on these, as well as thoughts from others.

    I would like to see a concentration on these subjects from all local blogs. With BS being a great site for in-depth discussion, I am especially intrigued with what might be uncovered here. Can’t wait to read!

  8. Rail (light, commuter, trolleys), untangling the Cordish mess, regionalism, downtown development (particularly Museum Plaza, Portland Wharf Park, Shippingport, 100 block of Main St., Life Sciences Park, River Park Place, et al) and a deeper understanding/appreciation of organic development, i.e. NuLu, versus overly-subsidized generic development, i.e. 4th Street Live.

  9. If things are going to get political, I would like to read something about the candidates’ approaches to Frankfort, including both the legislature and DOT. Our current mayor did not build the arena. Frankfort did. And Frankfort would be behind construction of a downtown bridge, or construction of any significant public asset. The first candidate to actively encourage all Louisville citizens to learn about, meet, and pressure their local rep to put Louisville ahead of their party would deserve some credit, win or lose.
    http://www.lojic.org/apps/products/cart/index.cfm

  10. I was wondering if anyone here attended the Mayoral forum yesterday dealing with downtown development. Reading from the Ville Voice it sounds like Fischer said some really dumb thing concerning downtown housing…

  11. With merger now fading into the past, we need a new Mayor that can lead the REGION. Louisville seems to confront a lot of problems because it doesn't engage with Oldham, or Bullitt, to say nothing of the 400,000 people living across the river in Indiana! The ability and enthusiasm to lead on these regional land-use and transportation issues is the #1 challenge for our next mayor.

    –and on the bridges, just let me say: I'm looking forward to be able to vote against them, finally–

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