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Check out this bike crossing in Portland, Oregon. The Art of Placemaking tipped us to this one in a recent piece about moving people around a city: “The heart of a livable city is the efficient and free movement of people.” This bike lane in Portland is located at the end of a major dedicated bike/recreation corridor (Kinda like the Beargrass Trail?) where it empties out onto city streets (Kinda like Grinstead and Lexington?). The signal allows a biker to press a button, stopping traffic in all directions, so diagonal movement of bikes is allowed in the intersection. This eliminates the need to cross one street and then wait to cross another. It even comes with its own biker shaped traffic light.

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Branden Klayko

3 COMMENTS

  1. maybe we already have them but they’re just invisible to drivers?!

    i’m a fan of cycling and cyclists – and i know that i’m only talking about a few, not all – but cyclists don’t do themselves any favors by jumping or simply blowing through lights and stop signs at which auto traffic is stopped. how are the cars supposed to know what to expect from them?

  2. I’ve seen some people in other cities advocate a law that says bicyclists can treat stop signs as yields (meaning, slow down) and red lights as stop signs.

    I don’t see a problem with this myself, as long as people are aware of it and cyclists obey it. (Arguably this is what most cyclists do anyway.)

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