Broken Bike Lane on Spring Street
Share on Facebook
Share on Twitter
Share on Google+
Share on LinkedIn
Pin to Pinterest
Share on StumbleUpon
+

Spring Street connects Louisville’s Irish Hill and Butchertown neighborhoods from Story Avenue to Lexington Road. The road was built for cars. As Louisville has been watching its image as a bike-friendly community, however, bike lanes were striped connecting Story Avenue to the Beargrass Creek Bike Trail at Locust Street. The bike lanes are broken now. No less than two-dozen cars were parked in the bike lanes near the railroad underpass despite clearly marked “No Stopping – Bike Lane” signs.

Broken Bike Lane on Spring Street
Broken Bike Lane on Spring Street. (Branden Klayko / Broken Sidewalk)
Broken Sidewalk on Spring Street
Broken Sidewalk on Spring Street. (Branden Klayko / Broken Sidewalk)

The threat of being towed was not even enough to stop these renegade autos. Farther down Spring Street, the bike lane becomes a narrow, barely-three-foot-wide stripe and is littered with uneven pavement and copious debris. Any bike brave enough to traverse this section of street would surely be done in by the broken glass and rock. But hey, the new bike lane signs look great!

The sidewalks along Spring Street aren’t any better. While uneven at best, vegetation has grown out of control to the point of fully blocking the sidewalk in certain spots, forcing pedestrians to cross a dangerous street without a crosswalk. Spring Street could be a great neighborhood street, but not yet in Possibility City.

Share on Facebook
Share on Twitter
Share on Google+
Share on LinkedIn
Pin to Pinterest
Share on StumbleUpon
+
Branden Klayko

Branden Klayko

Founder and Editor at Broken Sidewalk
Branden founded Broken Sidewalk in 2008 while practicing architecture in Louisville. He continued the site for seven years while living in New York City, returning to Louisville in 2016. Branden is a graduate of the College of Architecture at Washington University in St. Louis, and has covered architecture, design, and urbanism for The Architect's Newspaper, Designers & Books, Inhabitat, and the American Institute of Architects.
Branden Klayko

Leave a Reply