Historic view of the Big Four Bridge (courtesy R.D. Schooling)
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Historic view of the Big Four Bridge (courtesy R.D. Schooling)
Historic view of the Big Four Bridge. (Courtesy R.D. Schooling)

Now that the elliptical ramp up to the Big Four Bridge has been set into place sans its concrete walkway, Doug Proffitt of Whas11 took a trip up to the top platform to check out what must be one of the best views in Louisville. I can’t wait to check it out myself. See the video below which offers an up-close view of construction along with views of local landmarks.

Up above, you can see the bridge when trains still rolled between Louisville and Jeffersonville. You might note the wooden platform to the left of the tracks which allowed foot connection over the bridge 100 years ago. See the modern view in the video that’s much more dilapidated.

Also, for the sake of accuracy, a few claims in the video fall victim to the famous Louisville superlative. The Big Four isn’t unique in the country as the city claims. Converting rail bridges to pedestrian bridges is fairly common by now (although our spiral ramp is probably unique). Check out this example in Chattanooga. It’s also not the longest, although it will be really long at 2,525 feet excluding the ramps. A new pedestrian bridge in New York called the Poughkeepsie-Highland Railroad Bridge spans 6,767 feet, only slightly longer (more here and here).

[ Editor’s note: The Whas11 video appears not to be embedding properly. Check over on their website for the video if it doesn’t appear below. ]

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Branden Klayko

Founder and Editor at Broken Sidewalk
Branden founded Broken Sidewalk in 2008 while practicing architecture in Louisville. He continued the site for seven years while living in New York City, returning to Louisville in 2016. Branden is a graduate of the College of Architecture at Washington University in St. Louis, and has covered architecture, design, and urbanism for The Architect's Newspaper, Designers & Books, Inhabitat, and the American Institute of Architects.
Branden Klayko

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