Liberty Green Community Center (by Brandstetter Carroll courtesy Lou Metro Housing Authority)
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Construction at the Liberty Green development east of Downtown is a familiar site by now, but one building going up on the corner of Jefferson and Jackson Streets caught my eye. What distinguishes this structure from others built at Liberty Green is the blue Styrofoam form construction seen on the perimeter walls into which concrete is poured resulting in a strong and energy efficient building.

Construction at the Liberty Green Community Center
Construction at the Liberty Green Community Center. (Branden Klayko / Broken Sidewalk)

It turns out the Liberty Green Community Center is LEED-registered and represents the Louisville Metro Housing Authority‘s first structure going for the USGBC’s Leadership in Energy & Environmental Design certification. The Romanesque-style structure designed by Brandstetter Carroll‘s Louisville office will feature geothermal heating and cooling, a light colored roof to reflect excessive sun, and energy efficient appliances, lighting, and windows. Pervious pavers will be installed in its parking lot to help with rainwater runoff and recharge the water table.

Included in the two-story, 15,000 square foot Community Center are a community room, kitchen, classrooms, offices, and eight public housing units. The stylistic choice of the more monumental Romanesque will help to differentiate the structure from surrounding residential buildings modeled after traditional and vernacular neighborhood styles found throughout Louisville. Construction is expected to be complete in the Spring of 2010.

Construction at the Liberty Green Community Center
Construction at the Liberty Green Community Center. (Branden Klayko / Broken Sidewalk)
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1 COMMENT

  1. It’s great to see that public funds are being spent wisely to produce a building that is not only attractive but less expensive to operate. I hope there will be an educational component about the building itself when complete.

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