Sustainable City Series: Urban Gardens (Courtesy UDS)
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Sustainable City Series: Urban Gardens (Courtesy UDS)
Sustainable City Series: Urban Gardens. (Courtesy UDS)

The tenth edition of the Sustainable City Series will be held Tuesday, July 7th at the Glassworks. These forums, hosted by the Urban Design Studio, have proven to be popular. Patrick Piuma, director of the UDS, told us that there has been record interest for the upcoming “Urban Gardens” event, so be sure to RSVP soon on the Urban Design Studio’s web site. Food will be provided by Ramsi’s and coffee will be supplied by Heine Brothers.

Here’s some information about the forum:

The tenth forum of the Sustainable City Series held by the Urban Design Studio focuses on the appropriate and sustainable ways to go about urban gardening from private to community-based gardens.
The growing demand for locally grown foods has been accompanied by an ever-increasing interest in the development of community and private gardens. There are many different types of community gardens out there and many more plans and hopes for the future, however there are some things that all these gardens have in common… the environment. The importance of taking the proper steps early on is critical, because even though your food may be grown locally, if you don’t know what is in the soil you are using, the food you produce is not necessarily any better than those shipped from thousands of miles away, and perhaps even worse.
Whether you are interested in starting a community garden, currently belong to one, have a backyard garden, or just enjoy local food, join us on July 7th to learn more about how to ensure that our local food system is sustainable.
Our guest speakers will be:
Ann Carroll works for the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Office of Brownfields and Land Revitalization. Carroll has training in science and public health and over 25 years experience working on a range of environmental protection and health issues in the US and internationally; including over 15 years with the US Environmental Protection Agency and former Office of Technology Assessment with the US Congress. Her efforts have focused on a range of environmental health hazards including hazardous wastes, lead and heavy metals as well as risk assessment and risk communication. She has worked in private consulting, with the National Governor’s Association and US EPA Offices in Washington DC and Boston Massachusetts and managed the Lead Reference Center of the NSW Environmental Protection Authority based in Sydney, New South Wales, Australia from 1996 to 2000, provided consulting services to India, Indonesia and a range of countries before returning to US EPA in February 2002 to work in the Office of Brownfields and Land Revitalization. Carroll recently has been accepted to Johns Hopkins University, Bloomberg School of Public Health to begin her doctorate in public health in Environmental Health Sciences beginning the fall of 2009.
Wayne Long has worked at the Jefferson County Cooperative Extension Service since December 2008 as the Agriculture and Natural Resources Agent and County Coordinator. Prior to coming to Louisville, Wayne had a consulting company working with Central Kentucky equine farm managers and owners on various forage and environmental issues. He joined the University of Kentucky’s College of Agriculture’s Plant and Soil Science Department in 2001 as a member of the research team investigating causes of the Mare Reproductive Loss Syndrome (MRLS). While at UK, Long began a PhD program in Equine Forage Management and Ecology that he hopes to complete soon. From 1981 to 2001 he worked in management positions at Spendthrift Farm and Shadwell Farm. In the late 90s, while working on a master’s of Biology degree from Eastern Kentucky University that focused on wetland flora and aquatic ecology, Long became acutely aware of the devastating power humans have on the environment committing him to do his part of lessening the impact and assisting others to do the same. He now looks forward to the collaborative efforts between the Extension Service, local agencies and communities.
Sarah Fritschner is the Board President of the local sustainable composting and economic development project, Breaking New Grounds. Fritschner is currently a member of the Food in Neighborhoods Economic Development Committee, part of Mayor’s Healthy Hometown. She is also a board member of Bern heim Arboretum. Her interests involve increasing the communication between and improving the relationships among Kentucky farmers and Louisville Metro institutions. That relationship creates a more vibrant local food economy by providing Kentucky-grown foods to institutions from corporate offices to schools and nursing homes to emergency food supplies. She is the sole proprietor of BetterWorld-PR, presently engaged in project management, communications and marketing for several non-profit and for-profit enterprises.
The event will be held on Tuesday, July 7th at Glassworks (815 W Market Street, Louisville, KY) and is free and open to the public. For more information on the Sustainable City Series, to RSVP for the upcoming event, or to learn more about the Urban Design Studio, please visit our website at http://uds.louisville.edu or contact Patrick Piuma, the Director of the Urban Design Studio at 502.587.7015 or email udslouisville@gmail.com.

The tenth forum of the Sustainable City Series held by the Urban Design Studio focuses on the appropriate and sustainable ways to go about urban gardening from private to community-based gardens.

The growing demand for locally grown foods has been accompanied by an ever-increasing interest in the development of community and private gardens. There are many different types of community gardens out there and many more plans and hopes for the future, however there are some things that all these gardens have in common… the environment. The importance of taking the proper steps early on is critical, because even though your food may be grown locally, if you don’t know what is in the soil you are using, the food you produce is not necessarily any better than those shipped from thousands of miles away, and perhaps even worse.

Whether you are interested in starting a community garden, currently belong to one, have a backyard garden, or just enjoy local food, join us on July 7th to learn more about how to ensure that our local food system is sustainable.

Our guest speakers will be:

Ann Carroll works for the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Office of Brownfields and Land Revitalization. Carroll has training in science and public health and over 25 years experience working on a range of environmental protection and health issues in the US and internationally; including over 15 years with the US Environmental Protection Agency and former Office of Technology Assessment with the US Congress. Her efforts have focused on a range of environmental health hazards including hazardous wastes, lead and heavy metals as well as risk assessment and risk communication. She has worked in private consulting, with the National Governor’s Association and US EPA Offices in Washington DC and Boston Massachusetts and managed the Lead Reference Center of the NSW Environmental Protection Authority based in Sydney, New South Wales, Australia from 1996 to 2000, provided consulting services to India, Indonesia and a range of countries before returning to US EPA in February 2002 to work in the Office of Brownfields and Land Revitalization. Carroll recently has been accepted to Johns Hopkins University, Bloomberg School of Public Health to begin her doctorate in public health in Environmental Health Sciences beginning the fall of 2009.

Wayne Long has worked at the Jefferson County Cooperative Extension Service since December 2008 as the Agriculture and Natural Resources Agent and County Coordinator. Prior to coming to Louisville, Wayne had a consulting company working with Central Kentucky equine farm managers and owners on various forage and environmental issues. He joined the University of Kentucky’s College of Agriculture’s Plant and Soil Science Department in 2001 as a member of the research team investigating causes of the Mare Reproductive Loss Syndrome (MRLS). While at UK, Long began a PhD program in Equine Forage Management and Ecology that he hopes to complete soon. From 1981 to 2001 he worked in management positions at Spendthrift Farm and Shadwell Farm. In the late 90s, while working on a master’s of Biology degree from Eastern Kentucky University that focused on wetland flora and aquatic ecology, Long became acutely aware of the devastating power humans have on the environment committing him to do his part of lessening the impact and assisting others to do the same. He now looks forward to the collaborative efforts between the Extension Service, local agencies and communities.

Sarah Fritschner is the Board President of the local sustainable composting and economic development project, Breaking New Grounds. Fritschner is currently a member of the Food in Neighborhoods Economic Development Committee, part of Mayor’s Healthy Hometown. She is also a board member of Bernheim Arboretum. Her interests involve increasing the communication between and improving the relationships among Kentucky farmers and Louisville Metro institutions. That relationship creates a more vibrant local food economy by providing Kentucky-grown foods to institutions from corporate offices to schools and nursing homes to emergency food supplies. She is the sole proprietor of BetterWorld-PR, presently engaged in project management, communications and marketing for several non-profit and for-profit enterprises.

The event will be held on Tuesday, July 7th at Glassworks (815 W Market Street, Louisville, KY) and is free and open to the public. For more information on the Sustainable City Series, to RSVP for the upcoming event, or to learn more about the Urban Design Studio, please visit our website at http://uds.louisville.edu or contact Patrick Piuma, the Director of the Urban Design Studio at 502.587.7015 or email udslouisville@gmail.com.

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Branden Klayko

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