Two-way traffic headed for First and Brook streets (Bing Maps and Broken Sidewalk)
Two-way traffic headed for First and Brook streets (Bing Maps and Broken Sidewalk)
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This summer, First and Brook streets running through Old Louisville and SoBro will be converted from one-way through-streets to two-way neighborhood streets. After nearly a decade of talk, the plan finally made it to Metro Council and was approved on April 14.

A study commissioned by the late Councilman George Unseld had previously been completed in February and found the two streets needed work. Two-way traffic will be allowed between Hill and College streets.

“More two-way streets are an important part of our strategy to renew historic neighborhoods near downtown,” said Councilman David James in a statement. “Converting a majority of one-way streets to two ways allows for additional parking, trees, and bike lanes that calm traffic, making neighborhoods more livable for all who utilize the urban parts of our city.”

Talk like that is refreshing from our local leaders, right? He goes on: “Slowing this traffic down not only means safer streets for families, but also additional economic development in the neighborhood. Storefront exposures go through the roof when traffic is slowed, as opposed to cars simply driving right by only paying attention to the cars around them and how fast they are going.”

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Branden Klayko

Founder and Editor at Broken Sidewalk
Branden founded Broken Sidewalk in 2008 while practicing architecture in Louisville. He continued the site for seven years while living in New York City, returning to Louisville in 2016. Branden is a graduate of the College of Architecture at Washington University in St. Louis, and has covered architecture, design, and urbanism for The Architect's Newspaper, Designers & Books, Inhabitat, and the American Institute of Architects.
Branden Klayko

5 COMMENTS

  1. Count me among the cautiously optimistic.

    What’s this talk about bike lanes, though? How on earth are we going to squeeze in a legitimate bike lane — one that is outside the door-zone — on either Brook or First?

  2. From what I can tell, Eric, Councilman James was speaking generically about the benefits of reorganizing streets. I don’t believe a bike lane is being added to Brook/First. That’s how I read it, but I’ll try to find out a definite answer soon.

  3. I have driven these two new two-way streets and they are now wonderful. Seeing the historic houses from both directions is almost like seeing a new town. The neighborhood can now appreciate the serenity that the east end has had all along without the 1960’s one-way blight. All the streets need to be fixed. We are always 10 years behind other cities. Thank you alderman James

  4. So far, I love it. It’s a completely different pace. Still interested to see what will happen at 1st an Oak during the afternoon rush hour, though. Lots of southbound cars are going to be making lefts into oncoming traffic in order to access I-65. We may need a left turn lane eventually.

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