"As the Old Crow Flies" on East Market Street. (Courtesy The Green Building)
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Following up on the new sculpture-slash-bike-rack at The Green Building called “As the Old Crow Flies” by Jacob Heustis, a few tipsters have written in with mixed thoughts on the functionality of the piece as a bike rack, but readers generally remarked that the sculpture is a great addition to Nulu, and judging by last Friday’s trolley hop twitter chatter, quite a crowd gathered for the unveiling.

"As the Old Crow Flies" on East Market Street. (Courtesy Tipster)
“As the Old Crow Flies” on East Market Street. (Courtesy Tipster)

The wood and steel totem incorporates reclaimed wood from distilleries and arrows at the top indicate the direction and distance of the six Bourbon Trail distilleries surrounding Louisville. A void was left in the sculptures base and holes drilled in the steel legs to accommodate locking up a bike (see photo of the “Old Crow” filled with bikes above). Some readers expressed confusion as to the sculpture’s alter-ego, noting they would never think to lock a bike to it. Luckily, there’s still quite a bit of traditional bike parking right next to the artsy rack.

While I haven’t inspected the sculpture in person, it looks like there’s space for two bikes to be secured with a U-lock, but it might be a tight squeeze locking to the bike frame for one of them. Have you seen or tried out the new bike rack? What are your thoughts?

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Branden Klayko

Founder and Editor at Broken Sidewalk
Branden founded Broken Sidewalk in 2008 while practicing architecture in Louisville. He continued the site for seven years while living in New York City, returning to Louisville in 2016. Branden is a graduate of the College of Architecture at Washington University in St. Louis, and has covered architecture, design, and urbanism for The Architect's Newspaper, Designers & Books, Inhabitat, and the American Institute of Architects.
Branden Klayko

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